Quick Ideas on How to Work Smarter

Posted by Dewitt Bauer on September 25, 2014

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These ideas came from conferences, the latest books and top business-management journals published today.

 

 

1. Quick way to get rid of negative thoughts

Some of us tend toward negativity, especially when we get stressed out. Here are two ways to remind yourself to think of the positives:

Make a KIP sign for your desk (Keep It Positive) or write B+ (Be Positive) on a sticky note and put it where you can’t avoid looking at it.

 

2. Stuck on a problem? Try turning it around

Try this brain-storming technique the next time you’re problem solving with a team and you’re stumped:

Pretend you’re someone else.

In other words, turn the problem around and look at it from another department’s viewpoint, such as Sales or Human Resources. This just might open the door to a solution you hadn’t considered.

 

3. What’s the best way to deliver a message?

Telephone?  Email?  Face-to-face?

Which one should you use – and when?

  • Telephone: When you need to explain a subject in detail, or if you need feedback right away.
  • Email:When you’re sharing info and don’t need a response, or if you want a written record.
  • Face-to-face:When the info is sensitive or confidential. It also helps avoid miscommunication.

 

4. Before your next meeting, ask yourself this question

Would a simple email accomplish just as much?

The following results in a survey of nearly 1000 execs shows their opinion of the last 10 meetings they attended:

  • 51% said nothing happened in half of the meetings
  • 53% said nothing was accomplished in seven of the meetings
  • Less than 9% said something was accomplished in all 10 meetings.

 

5. Best way to handle new responsibilities

When you’re given a new position or even weightier responsibilities, you might be tempted into listing all the wonderful things you’re going to do.

Don’t.  Research shows it’s better to underpromise and overdeliver.

Why? You never know what unexpected obstacles may crop up.

 

Learn more by reading “The First 90 Days, Updated and Expanded” by Michael Watkins.

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